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Its not a Haladex system, it was designed completely in house by Ford engineers...

Unlike its key competitor, the VW Golf R, the Focus RS utilizes an all-wheel-drive system that is said to have been designed entirely in-house. Assuming the RS is traveling in a straight line with zero slip at any of its four tires, the all-wheel-drive setup sends 100 percent of the available power to the front axle. When slip is detected or if there is steering input, up to 70 percent of the available power can be sent rearward.
 

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Great infographic. The split of torque to the rear wheels looks great to me and seems like a setup that could in fact be one of the better setups out there on the market.

Drift setting is perfect for hooning it around like Ken Block :D
 

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The rumor is that the actual parts are still made by Haldex, and that it's just the total system design and arrangement that was developed by Ford's engineering team using Haldex's parts catalog as a basis...
 

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The Ford Focus RS’s Clever AWD System Will Spread Elsewhere (And We Think We’ve Seen It Before)

http://blog.caranddriver.com/the-ford-focus-rss-clever-awd-system-will-spread-elsewhere-and-we-think-weve-seen-it-before/?mag=cad&click=yr

Ford’s engineers rarely get to do things that upset the Blue Oval’s all-powerful accountants. Given that, our biggest surprise at the unveiling of the new Focus RS was the car’s extremely clever torque-vectoring all-wheel-drive system, considering the massive costs that must have gone into re-engineering the front-drive Focus to take it.

And although there’s no official confirmation of anything, the Ford execs on hand at the reveal event were happy to drop some very broad hints that we will see the system spread elsewhere among “performance” applications within the group.

“If you look at the thread of the presentation and what we’ve used these fast Fords for in the past, a lot of mainstream technologies that we use today came from these vehicles,” Joe Bakaj, Ford of Europe’s VP of product development told us. “And I can see this as one of those technologies of the future.”

2017 Ford Focus RS cutaway
Not that Ford is first to this particular party. The official details of what Ford calls the Focus’s Rear-Drive Unit are almost identical to those of the rear axle “Active Driveline” that Land Rover has recently introduced on higher-performance versions of the Range Rover Evoque. Both use twin electronically controlled clutches on the rear axle to send torque to the back wheels, and both are claimed to be capable of the same neat side-to-side torque-vectoring trick.

Land Rover’s system is made by GKN Driveline in Sweden, with the system being branded as “Twinster.” Ford did say they worked with GKN on the Focus RS, but we don’t know if the RS uses the exact same system or just a similar one—Ford executives refused to say, however nicely we asked them—but in any event it looks like an idea whose time has come.

As with Land Rover, Ford’s twin-clutch rear setup is likely to be the preserve of pricier and more dynamically focused cars; lesser four-wheel-drive Evoques still make do with a single-clutch system upstream of a conventional differential. But it’s not hard to see plenty of interest in Ford products that can deliver both more traction and increased agility. “I think it’s a breakthrough technology that has many opportunities,” Bakaj told us.
 

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This has me wondering how much they spent to reengineer the thing, must have been in the high tens to hundreds of millions.
 

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To be honest, i don't really care if the system is developed in house or not. What matters is how good it is.
Ultimately that's what matters, since its what will really effect us come time to put it to work with what we'll put it through.

I expect that we'll see some publications digging into it when the time comes.
 

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Has it been tested on a variety of surfaces yet? If the system can help me avoid a few poles in the winter months, that would be phenomenal.
 

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As long as you're not driving through a foot of snow you should be fine. Ford's in house AWD may have the same issue as the Haldex where it has a hard time keeping the wheels turning in deep snow. Once the Haldex is stuck in the snow it acts more like in a fwd car.
 

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As long as you're not driving through a foot of snow you should be fine. Ford's in house AWD may have the same issue as the Haldex where it has a hard time keeping the wheels turning in deep snow. Once the Haldex is stuck in the snow it acts more like in a fwd car.
Yup.

Looking for already packed snow is where you want to go but of course that can't always be the case. Another thing I do is try to take roads i'm familiar with, which is easy to do with regular commutes.
 

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Has it been tested on a variety of surfaces yet? If the system can help me avoid a few poles in the winter months, that would be phenomenal.
I'm more concerned about pot holes when its raining since its hard to tell if its just a slight low point in the pavement for water to collect or a damaging pothole with water filled to the top.
 

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As long as you're not driving through a foot of snow you should be fine. Ford's in house AWD may have the same issue as the Haldex where it has a hard time keeping the wheels turning in deep snow. Once the Haldex is stuck in the snow it acts more like in a fwd car.
no thats traction control..
 

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I'm more concerned about pot holes when its raining since its hard to tell if its just a slight low point in the pavement for water to collect or a damaging pothole with water filled to the top.
Did not think about that. My car had to have something replaced because of all the pot holes and bumps over the years. Can't quite recall what part it was. Never had an issue driving over them in the rain. Did you skid in one?
 

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Did not think about that. My car had to have something replaced because of all the pot holes and bumps over the years. Can't quite recall what part it was. Never had an issue driving over them in the rain. Did you skid in one?
It's why I try to travel on roads i'm familiar with so I know where and when to avoid instead of just running into things, at least with having a nice car, if my beater then i wouldn't care too much.
 

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It's why I try to travel on roads i'm familiar with so I know where and when to avoid instead of just running into things, at least with having a nice car, if my beater then i wouldn't care too much.
x2

Traveling behind people when unsure about road conditions goes a long way, let them be the guinea pig ;)
 

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I'm worried about the reliability of the AWD (Dynamic Torque Vectoring) clutch type system. And if it will only last as long as the warranty does. And if the scheduled service on those clutch packs will throw-up a red flag of any trouble.
 

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Does anybody here know the correct method to make the RS a Front Wheel ONLY drive mode? I cannot remember where I saw this, as one is to test front drive only on a 2-wheel dyno.
COBB sent me an infomercial that states there is a plug to be pulled near the front diff that converts to FWD only.
My rationale is I would love to carry a "donut spare" and don't want to burn out the rear diff if I place a small tire/wheel on the back. Also, don't know what would happen if a front wheel needed to be replaced with a mini-spare, but still, that can of "flat fix" will do NOTHING for a tire blown out by a pot-hole. Any expert thoughts would be greatly appreciated! THANKS!
 
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